As bluebonnet season arrives, Texas photographers share how to get the perfect picture

by AryanArtnews
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A friend sent a pin drop to Google Maps, and she was told that Horseshoe Bay, about 45 minutes from her home in Austin, was an endless vineyard of Texas flowers. Central Texas was near the end of the Colorado River basin drought, exposing certain parts of the bed around Lake Travis. Naro was told that in some of those beds, the blue bonnet had grown as far as the eye could see. So she called her friends Dave and Bonnie Mead and told her to dress her two children. It’s time to grab a picture of the most ridiculous blue bonnet they can. Old-fashioned Texas tradition.

But when they pulled into Horseshoe Bay, they didn’t see a single flower. Women in the area told them to turn the corner, and they would find what they were looking for.

“We only see dead things,” Naro replied.

“It’s just around the corner,” the woman repeated.

Naro and her friends Dave and Bonnie Mead passed Marble Falls in April 2015 and found a field of blue bonnets that photographers call “magic.”

Allison Naro

When they wrapped around Horseshoe Bay, ironically, they came across a rolling field of blue bonnets that was only possible by the cruel tricks of nature.

“It was astounding,” says Naro. “There are small spots on the blue bonnet and they are beautiful, but this was the whole field. We couldn’t believe it.”

Parents who want to take the perfect shot of their children in the field of the blue bonnet will be disappointed unless they do some preliminary research.

Parents who want to take the perfect shot of their children in the field of the blue bonnet will be disappointed unless they do some preliminary research.

Allison Naro

The fields may have returned to the water for now, but such fields are rarely found, but you can find growth in the blue bonnet other than the sparse belts beside the highway. Naro says that’s the key to good photography of the blue bonnet. Ask a friend for a hotspot, drive a car, and make a few attacks.

“To make that magic come true, we really have to do some research,” she says.

This extraordinary patch of blue bonnet is probably back in the water, but Naro says it's still possible to find a lush field.

This extraordinary patch of blue bonnet is probably back in the water, but Naro says it’s still possible to find a lush field.

Allison Naro

The blue bonnet grows very low to the ground and extends to public land, so Naro says you have to get out of your comfort zone. Even good places can usually rest for years due to bad seasons and climate change. And some of the hype blue bonnet locales are overrated.

“People think St. Edwards is a great place, but it’s not. It’s hard to take pictures,” says Naro. “If you want to take a lush photo with your kids, surrounded by a blue bonnet, you need to be a location scout.”


Margaret Isensee is a San Antonio-based architectural and landscape photographer. She agrees that her research is important in taking the best blue bonnet photos. She has members of various photo groups to which she belongs mention patches nearby, and her friends tell her that there is a good group of blue bonnets near the church. From time to time, she and her husband drive through the countryside looking for the right place.

“It’s a kind of hit or mistake,” she says. “There are many areas in one area and may not be in another. It takes patience.”

Isensee also says that many of the best blue bonnet fields are on private land. Once upon a time, in the early days of the pandemic, she and her husband parked on the side of the roadside of the Willow City Loop, a scenic hill country drive. Without thinking about it, they jumped out to get some good blue bonnet shots.

“And suddenly we hear this cry:’Hey, it’s our property! Get off!”

Her advice is to make sure there are no signs of “burglary” before thinking that trampling the land to take a picture is okay. If the location of the blue hood turns out to be on private land, she says there are some workarounds.

“You can take pictures from the side of the road,” she says. “Or, go home, knock on the door, and say,’Sorry, can I take a picture? No, but I think it’s a little better if you announce it. You’re okay. Who is it.”

By the side of the road, Isensee draws even more attention as people rush down and take guerrilla-style photos.

“If you’re in the park, you’ll stay on the road, or you can damage other plants and creatures,” she says. “Another thing is to watch out for holes and other things buried in the grass. Watch out for wildlife such as snakes and thorny plants. Wear long pants and good shoes for protection. Is probably a good thing. “

The blue bonnet goes down towards the ground, so many shots are tough unless you find a big field.

The blue bonnet goes down towards the ground, so many shots are tough unless you find a big field.

Allison Naro

Naro is still amazed at the abundant fields of blue bonnets he met many years ago. But she hit the jackpot in such a big way, so she doesn’t take many blue bonnet photos anymore.

“I don’t do them because of that expectation,” she says of her 2015 set. “I will probably never see such a thing again.”



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