Photographs by Helga Stentzel of clothes on a washing line transformed into charming animals

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“I saw the socks on the floor next to some pegs and noticed that they looked like horse heads,” she tells the creative boom. “It took me a while to develop my ideas and figure out how to build a horse’s body. The socks were too small and the horse didn’t have enough details, so I eventually replaced them with pants.”

Since then, Helga has developed the Clothing Line Animals series, sharing her work to gain popularity on social media and selling prints in online shops. A fun image called a home-use surrealism makes everyday things playfully upside down. When you see polar bears hanging against the snow, you’ll find “Coin Rosaurs,” “Actually a Manual for Becoming a Paleontologist,” and a brown cow. Most recently, Helga created a hanging white dove to represent peace between nations. Sold as printed matter, all proceeds are donated to charities operating in Ukraine.




Wait a minute! © Helga Stentzel

Peace © Helga Stentzel



Peace © Helga Stentzel

My kind of grapes © Helga Stentzel



My kind of grapes © Helga Stentzel

Real eggplant © Helga Stentzel



Real eggplant © Helga Stentzel

Helga has worked in a wide range of media including illustration, photography, video and stop motion animation, won the Food Art Creator of the Year in 2020, and has worked with the BBC, Honda and O2. After graduating from Central Saint Martins, working in the advertising industry and running a children’s clothing business, she became a full-time artist.

Animals on the clothing line follow other popular pieces such as Food For Thought. Here, Helga takes one edible treat, merges it with another object, and doubles each of her fine art photos. The head of a Lego figure becomes a sweet corn, or suddenly a dozen eggs have a stem, as seen in tomatoes.

“I started creative photography on Instagram about six years ago. It was a small project for kids at first, but it’s a little more thoughtful project for adults,” she says. “I like to see everyday things like bread, cheese, tablecloth folds, etc. The fact that these objects are very recognizable and common makes me study them more carefully. It’s like a visual meditation for me. “

Happy Home © Helga Stentzel



Happy Home © Helga Stentzel

Lighten the load © Helga Stentzel



Lighten the load © Helga Stentzel

Cranky © Helga Stentzel



Cranky © Helga Stentzel

Bloodpet © Helga Stentzel



Bloodpet © Helga Stentzel

In other artwork, Helga placed a line of clothing under the property window to create a sleepy smiling brick wall character with two hanging socks in front of two washing machines. I created a laundry basket and created a goofy happy face. Edible creatures include gorgeous little puppies made of lettuce and the “ultimate comfort dog” made of sliced ​​bread called Blood Pets inspired by the British Bake Off. “For me, home surrealism is about finding magic in the mundane, seeing flawed beauty, and connecting to our reality in new ways,” she explains.

“I love to notice playful similarities. Whether it’s a horse-looking clothing sweater or a slice of bread that looks like a dog’s head. That’s just the starting point. From this moment on, the story And the visuals start to get lively in me. Head: What does this horse look like? What is her name and character? Does she like to compete with other horses? List The number will increase steadily! “

When it comes to the process, Helga likes to minimize editing and spend more time making high quality props instead. “I once glued 52 gummy bears to the vine as one of my works,” she explains. “About a year ago, I hand-painted a polar bear hat on another piece. The bear itself was shot at -32C in Russia, and it was an unforgettable experience to try out stamina and photographic equipment.”

He is socks © Helga Stentzel



He is socks © Helga Stentzel

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