Turner painting which was thought to be a fake for a CENTURY fetched £1million at Sotheby’s auction

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Turner’s painting, which was considered fake for over a century, was reassigned to the painter and won £ 1 million at the auction last week.

The oil painting of Cilgerran Castle in Wales is the second version of another painting of the same view by JM W Turner, which has confused art experts, both genuine and fake, for over 100 years.

Since being exhibited at the Guild Hall in 1899, art scholars have been discussing the legitimacy of this painting.

Eventually, it was agreed that this painting was probably made at the beginning of Turner’s career, but with changes that are more reminiscent of the second half of his life.

Thanks to years of research and state-of-the-art technology, experts were able to conclude that Turner had changed the painting himself, Telegraph reported.

JWW Turner’s oil painting of Cilgerran Castle in Wales, considered fake for over a century, has been reassigned to the Master-and it sold for £ 1 million at this week’s Sotheby’s auction.

And this piece is currently on sale for £ 1m at Sotheby’s Old Masters Evening Auction.

Julian Gascoigne, a senior specialist in Sotheby’s British painting, said it took three years to verify the authenticity of the painting.

The auction house first evaluated the painting for the previous owner, and the work that it should be compared to the original to help confirm that it is genuine requires further investigation. Was decided by the team.

Turner expert Ian Worrell examined both paintings at Cragside and concluded that they were most likely created “with the same hand.”

Turner, depicted in the 1867 drawings, purchased the painting through an agent, modified it, and resold it.

Turner, depicted in the 1867 drawings, purchased the painting through an agent, modified it, and resold it.

Gascoigne said: ‘The last piece of the jigsaw puzzle is that in 1827, Turner himself repurchased this photo from Sir John Fleming Lester, a very important collector who bought the photo a few years ago.

At the time of purchase, Turner had repurchased some of his work with the idea of ​​donating to the state.

Turner used an agent to buy back the work, so the name of the catalog was different.

Wallel discovered reports from the time he revealed in 1827 that it was Turner who bought the painting on his behalf.

Gascoin revealed that Turner, who was later in his life when he bought back the painting, set out to fix an aspect of it that he wasn’t happy with.

After making the changes, Turner sold it to his patron, Hugh Andrew Johnstone, Manro of Nova.

To claim the authenticity of the painting, Sotheby’s team used a dedicated X-ray fluorescence device to map the elements and components of the paint.

This painting in the photo was bought back by Turner later in life and set out to correct aspects of his previous work that he wasn't happy with.

This painting in the photo was bought back by Turner later in life and set out to correct aspects of his previous work that he wasn’t happy with.

They cross-referenced their research and information and were able to confirm that the paintings were all from Turner.

Technological advances have helped professionals uncover the hidden stories of the most respected painters.

In October, a hidden Picasso painting of a naked crouching woman lying beneath another piece was reconstructed by scientists using artificial intelligence and 3D printing.

A team at University College London (UCL) said a one-time replica of “Lonely Crouching Nude” ensures that the work is “not erased from history.”

Experts believe that Picasso was somewhat reluctant to fill his work early in his relatively poor career in order to reuse expensive canvas at once.

The original was first revealed by a 2010 X-ray fluorescence scan under Picasso’s late 1903 work The Blind Man’s Diet (a paraphrase of the Christian sacrament).

The discovery ended a long quest for the lost work — it was known from Picasso’s depiction of the background of the modern oil painting “La Vi”.

All three works are from the artist’s “Picasso’s Blue Period” from 1901 to 1904, all monochromatic and partly influenced by the suicide of his friend Carles Casagemas and Picasso’s trip to Spain. ..

The Blind Man’s Meal-and the early work it hides-is currently being held in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

This is not the first lost work reproduced by a researcher. They previously duplicated the portrait of a woman hidden under Amedeo Modigliani’s 1917 “Portrait of a Lady”.

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